Australia

  • Best Brekkie Spots in Bondi Beach

    Porch and Parlour

    Photo Credit: Kathryn Fischer

    Photo Credit: Kathryn Fischer

    Porch and Parlour typifies the “local Bondi” breakfast scene – gorgeous customers, beautifully presented food and a chilled-out, bohemian ambiance. The cafe specializes in healthy, wholesome choices. Try and grab a seat at the wooden tables outside for a sweeping view of Bondi’s glistening waters from its north end. A favorite of many is the green brekkie bowl. This bowl is packed with an antioxidant-rich mixture of kale, silver  beet, spinach, coriander, mint and parsley. Quinoa, two soft-boiled eggs, avocado and a slice of lemon are also served with the bowl.

    Trio

    Photo Credit: Kathryn Fischer

    Photo Credit: Kathryn Fischer

    Set on the bustling Campbell Parade, Trio has perfected brunch. Elegant touches, like the seamless white tablecloths, glass water jugs stuffed with fresh mint leaves and polished silverware allow this restaurant to stand out amongst the plethora of eateries along Bondi’s main strip. The menu is brimming with savory and sweet options, and caters to all sorts of eaters. Prime position is out on the sidewalk, which allows you to take in the panoramic views of Bondi Beach. If you can’t get a seat outside, the floor-length windows allow the sea breeze to waft in.

    Brown Sugar

    Photo Credit: Kathryn Fischer

    Photo Credit: Kathryn Fischer

    This small eatery whips up tasty brunch items with a Mediterranean twist. The black and white checkered floors, dark lacquer tables and chalkboard walls create a contemporary, casual vibe. My top choice from the Brown Sugar menu is the black stone eggs: a fluffy English muffin topped with a hearty slice of bacon, broiled tomatoes and a free-range poached egg. It comes with crispy golden hash brown balls, which knock traditional, bland breakfast potatoes out of the park!

     

    Though I was born and raised in Philadelphia, a city that values tradition, my path of life has been not so standard. I’ve lived on the East and West coasts of the United States, and have ventured over the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, studying food and wine in Italy, and working in the travel industry in Australia. Travelling across the globe has allowed me to recognize my true passion: helping others experience this beautiful, yet varied world that we live in. I have a wandering soul that continually urges me to visit new countries, meet new people, and learn new things; I love to adventure to faraway destinations, discovering unfamiliar cultures, and tasting their local cuisine.

    June 11, 2018 • Articles, Australia, Destinations, Kathryn Fischer, Travels • Views: 3878

  • Sky, Land and Water in New South Wales

    BridgeClimb

    Climb the Sydney Harbour Bridge in New South Wales – all the way to the top. You start at street level and then ascend above the cacophony of traffic and city sounds. On the way, your guide will tell you about the structure you are climbing, about its unique and storied history. At the top there is only a soft breeze and a vast, soundless horizon. From here you can hold the Sydney Opera House in the palm of your hand and, if dusk is approaching, watch the sun melt into the water.

    Photo Credit: Max Wasserman

    Photo Credit: Max Wasserman

    Explore Chippendale and Redfern

    Few tourists venture into Chippendale and Redfern – neighborhoods that were once slims but are now undergoing an urban revitalization. The architecture is eclectic, the neighborhood’s gritty past pushing up against a future that is smooth and sleek. Locally owned shops line the streets offering everything from coffee to exotic furniture. Wall murals are commonplace and each tells a story. Explore the past, present and future in these relatively unknown but electric areas.

    Photo Credit: Max Wasserman

    Photo Credit: Max Wasserman

    From Pot to Plate

    Step on a boat in Byron Bay and venture into the past, experiencing the traditional cultural and hunting practices of the Aboriginal people. At the Terranora Lakes, you leave the boat and wade in the water up to your waist with a spear, trying to spot fish in the clear water against a lush green island backdrop. On the muddy shores, you can find crab to catch. Then, the guides cook them over an open flame. You step back on the boat and are driven to the pots of crab, eating oysters along the way. When you reach the pots, you hail them up one by one and lunch is served.

    Photo Credit: Max Wasserman

    Photo Credit: Max Wasserman

    Photo Credit: Max Wasserman

    Photo Credit: Max Wasserman

    My passion for travel was triggered by a trip overseas to Italy and it has not faded since. I have always been fascinated by world history and working at Swain Destinations has provided me with an opportunity to see how places with inauspicious beginnings, like Sydney, Australia, have been transformed into cultural and economic hubs, with tourism as its main driver. I enjoy knowing that I play a part in that. When I am not working, you can find me reading and writing and watching films.

    May 23, 2018 • Articles, Australia, Destinations, Max Wasserman, Travels • Views: 2125

  • Get Festive in New South Wales

    Vivid Sydney

    Sydney Harbour | Photo Credit: Destination New South Wales

    Sydney Harbour | Photo Credit: Destination New South Wales

    The weather in Sydney in May is absolutely beautiful and the addition of  Vivid Sydney enhances your stay. Vivid Sydney is the world’s largest festival of light, showcasing innovation and creativity across the iconic city. The Sydney skyline, harbor, Opera House and bridge all come alive with bright light installations each night during the festival. This spectacle of light and music transforms the city into an artistic wonderland. You can even view from a private boat on the harbor! I would add an extra day in Sydney to experience it.

    Crystallise Light Installation | Photo Credit: Destination New South Wales

    Crystallise Light Installation | Photo Credit: Destination New South Wales

    Magicians of the Mist | Photo Credit: Destination New South Wales

    Magicians of the Mist | Photo Credit: Destination New South Wales

    New Year’s Eve in Sydney

    New Year's Eve Fireworks | Photo Credit: Destination New South Wales

    New Year’s Eve Fireworks | Photo Credit: Destination New South Wales

    It was my first New Year’s Eve in Sydney, and knowing I would soon be climbing the bridge, sailing under it and seeing the world’s most spectacular fireworks display, had my adrenaline surging. The evening begins cruising around Sydney Harbour for a few hours enjoying champagne and the view. Then, they serve dinner after the first round of mesmerizing fireworks. Finally, right at midnight, the second round of fireworks begins which lasted much longer. The finale could not be put into words. New Year’s Eve in Sydney exceeded my expectations.

    Sydney Harbour Fireworks | Photo Credit: Ian Swain II

    Sydney Harbour Fireworks | Photo Credit: Ian Swain II

    Opera House on New Year's Eve | Photo Credit: Destination New South Wales

    Opera House on New Year’s Eve | Photo Credit: Destination New South Wales

    Handa on the Opera

    Sydney Opera House | Photo Credit: Opera Australia

    Sydney Opera House | Photo Credit: Opera Australia

    Imagine sitting on the edge of the park in the Royal Botanical Gardens, with Opera Australia performing on a floating stage and the famed Sydney Opera House and Harbour Bridge as the back drop. Each year the performance changes! I suggest taking the VIP package with access to the lounge before and during the intermission. This is not an event to be missed!

    Hosh Carmen Dancer | Photo Credit: Opera Australia

    Hosh Carmen Dancer | Photo Credit: Opera Australia

    Madama Butterfly | Photo Credit: Opera Australia

    Madama Butterfly | Photo Credit: Opera Australia

    This self-described “true blue Aussie” was born in Brisbane and showed a true knack for entrepreneurship. After meeting and marrying Linda, an American with a penchant for international travel, they started Swain Australia Tours (now Swain Destinations) in 1987. Over the course of the next 10 years, Swain Destinations became the largest seller of South Pacific travel on the East Coast.

    May 23, 2018 • Articles, Australia, Destinations, Ian Swain Sr, Travels • Views: 2625

  • Where to Stay in New South Wales

    The Langham Sydney

    Lobby | Photo Credit: The Langham, Sydney

    Lobby | Photo Credit: The Langham, Sydney

    The Langham Sydney is tucked away in a residential area in the historic Rocks district. Just minutes from the hustle and bustle of Sydney Harbour, this charming hotel has a residential feel. It is a tranquil oasis after a busy day of sightseeing. I especially love that each of the 98 rooms and suites is decorated in an elegant and classic style. Each room overlooks the Western Harbour or the city. You can treat yourself at the wonderful Spa by Chuan. Also, you can enjoy the beautiful indoor heated pool with its star-covered ceiling – a Sydney icon! A favorite of mine is afternoon tea with Wedgwood in the Palm Court. You certainly don’t want to miss this indulgent experience!

    Grand Langham Room | Photo Credit: The Langham, Sydney

    Grand Langham Room | Photo Credit: The Langham, Sydney

    Afternoon Tea | Photo Credit: The Langham, Sydney

    Afternoon Tea | Photo Credit: The Langham, Sydney

    Pool | Photo Credit: The Langham, Sydney

    Pool | Photo Credit: The Langham, Sydney

    Emirates One&Only Wolgan Valley

    Wolgan Valley | Photo Credit: Emirates One&Only Wolgan Valley

    Wolgan Valley | Photo Credit: Emirates One&Only Wolgan Valley

    Emirates One&Only Wolgan Valley is a conservation-based resort set in a 7,000-acre nature reserve in the World Heritage-listed Blue Mountains area. The resort is an easy three-hour drive or a 45-minute helicopter flight from Sydney. A stay at Wolgan gives a unique opportunity to explore the Australian bush in style, with superb accommodation and outstanding food and wine!

    One of the highlights of this property are the charming individual villas. These villas are complete with a double fire place and each with their own plunge pool and veranda allowing for beautiful views over the valley. Above all, there is never a lack of things to do! Activities range from 4WD adventures that allow you to spot local wildlife to colonial heritage tours and stargazing. The spa at Wolgan Valley is outstanding, but I would recommend pre-booking any treatments. A stay at Wolgan Valley is the quintessential Australian experience. It is one of my favorite places in New South Wales for a relaxing, authentic adventure in understated luxury.

    Horses | Photo Credit: Emirates One&Only Wolgan Valley

    Horses | Photo Credit: Emirates One&Only Wolgan Valley

    Picnic | Photo Credit: Emirates One&Only Wolgan Valley

    Picnic | Photo Credit: Emirates One&Only Wolgan Valley

    Wildlife Drive | Photo Credit: Emirates One&Only Wolgan Valley

    Wildlife Drive | Photo Credit: Emirates One&Only Wolgan Valley

    The Byron at Byron Bay Resort and Spa

    Exterior | Photo Credit: The Byron at Byron Bay

    Exterior | Photo Credit: The Byron at Byron Bay

    The Byron at Byron Bay Resort and Spa sits in a coastal rainforest, minutes from a stunning beach and coastline. The resort has a casual, laid-back yet elegant vibe. Dining at the Byron at Byron Bay is a true fine dining experience where you will enjoy fresh, seasonal and locally-sourced food in the restaurant overlooking the rainforest. The comfortable suites are located within the sub-tropical rainforests with screened in porches and spacious living areas.

    Complimentary yoga classes are offered, and the multi-award-winning spa is definitely worth a visit! You can visit the gym, tennis courts or go on a guided walk through the rainforest – this resort certainly has something for every traveler! Also, the resort has a complimentary shuttle to take you to the center of Byron Bay, a beachside town with a quirky style and a thriving food scene. The Byron at Byron Bay is an oasis of tranquility where you can enjoy wonderful hospitality!

    Deluxe Spa Suite | Photo Credit: The Byron at Byron Bay

    Deluxe Spa Suite | Photo Credit: The Byron at Byron Bay

    Infinity Pool | Photo Credit: The Byron at Byron Bay

    Infinity Pool | Photo Credit: The Byron at Byron Bay

    The Restaurant | Photo Credit: The Byron at Byron Bay

    The Restaurant | Photo Credit: The Byron at Byron Bay

    Anne Pace, born and raised in Australia has traveled extensively throughout the world. She returns frequently to her favorite destination, her hometown of Sydney.

    May 22, 2018 • Anne Pace, Articles, Australia, Destinations, Property Highlights, Travels • Views: 2656

  • Experience Vivid Sydney

    A Festival of Light

    More than just beautiful and inspiring, Vivid Sydney is exceptionally fun. As much as you are exploring and observing the unique installations, you are also interacting with them.

    Photo Credit: Destination New South Wales

    My most memorable moment was arriving in Circular Quay as the lights began projecting on the sails of the Sydney Opera House. The colors and designs were incredibly vivid, adding this overwhelming sense of surrealism to such an iconic structure.

    Photo Credit: Ian Swain II

    Photo Credit: Ian Swain II

    Photo Credit: Ian Swain II

    Write New South Wales in on your travel list around Vivid Sydney. Experiences like these leave you with that unforgettable WOW feeling – and it is only getting better!

    Photo Credit: Ian Swain II

    Photo Credit: Ian Swain II

    Photo Credit: Ian Swain II

    Photo Credit: Destination New South Wales

    Let me know your thoughts on my favorite shots from my Vivid Sydney adventure!

    Most claim that this captivating young adventurer made his first appearance in the travel industry at the tender age of five, working diligently to become the most efficient brochure boxer this side of the Atlantic, all the while running up and down the office halls in-between projects. Always following his father around the office throughout the years, Ian began to learn the ropes and become more engaged with the company and travel industry. As Ian grew older, his knowledge and skill set were outpaced only by his passion for travel and desire to see the world, venturing to destinations across the globe from Australia to Africa,. After four years of study, and a few years working within the hotel industry, Ian began his official career much like it started, with a wide-eyed enthusiasm and tireless work.

    May 2, 2018 • Articles, Australia, Ian Swain II, Travels • Views: 2898

  • Five Myths About Koalas

    Koalas are so cute they could be mythical creatures; maybe that’s why there are many popular myths about them. Below are the top five most popular myths about these fuzzy creatures.

    Myth 1: Koalas are “drunk/high” on eucalyptus

    This is possibly one of the most popular myths in the animal kingdom. In fact, if you start typing into google, “are koalas…” the first option is “are koalas high”!

    The idea that we’re not the only species on the planet that gets intoxicated is gratifying. That this intemperate animal should be Australian resonates with the world view of Australia: a land of friendly, sozzled creatures lazing about in the sun. However, koalas are not drunk or high on eucalyptus! There is no alcohol in eucalyptus to intoxicate them. They do rest a lot, but it’s not due to a hangover!

    Koala in Tree | Photo Credit: Echidna Walkabout

    Photo Credit: Echidna Walkabout

    Myth 2: Koalas only eat one type of gum-tree

    So, these creatures live all over Australia, but only eat one tree? No wonder such a fussy animal is dying out!

    However, this is not true. Koalas in the You Yangs near Melbourne have been recorded eating every one of the 15 species of eucalypt in the park. All over Australia, the gum-trees they eat number in the hundreds of species!

    This myth may have started from some early scientific research that showed that koalas have a high preference for certain species of eucalyptus in certain regions. That can be true in some places, but not in others. In the You Yangs, 34% of koala sightings are in River Red Gum Trees. The rest of the time, they are in Blue Gums, Yellow Gums, Ironbarks, Sugar Gums and many other types.

    Myth 3: Koalas are slow

    Researchers probably wish this were true. A koala can run on the ground at around 32km per hour. If frightened, they can leap up a tree in 2 metre bounds.

    Koalas lead a slow lifestyle most of the time. They rest a lot due to the low nutrient value of their food, but when they move, they can be fast, agile and powerful.

    Myth 4: Koalas are docile and love to be pet and cuddled

    These cute creatures are still wild animals and like most wild animals, they prefer to have no contact with humans at all.

    Two independent scientific studies: a 2014 University of Melbourne study (1) and a 2009 study (2), found that even captive koalas, born and raised in a zoo, experience stress when humans approached too close to them. In the wild, Echidna Walkabout Nature Tours have found that 10 metres is the closest you should ever be to a koala. Any closer, and the koala’s behavior changes — they stop resting or feeding and they stare nervously. Unfortunately for them, they look cute even when they are terrified.

    Now an orphaned koala being raised by a wildlife carer may enjoy being pet by their carer. But all evidence suggests koalas do not enjoy being pet by strangers.

    Photo Credit: Echidna Walkabout

    Photo Credit: Echidna Walkabout

    Myth 5: Koalas are so numerous, they are hanging out of trees everywhere

    This is not true. Wild koalas are declining at a rate of 53% in Queensland, 26% in the small remaining population of New South Wales and 14% in Victoria. That is why they are listed as “Vulnerable” (one step below endangered). The IUCN lists them as one of the 10 species worldwide most at risk from climate change (3).

    This myth comes from two partial-truths — the first is historical: there was once a time when the animals were very plentiful across their range. However, that time is long gone. The other partial-truth is that there are five to six small pockets in southern Victoria and South Australia where koalas are overabundant (4), for reasons that are not understood. These populations receive a lot of media and research attention, which makes them seem larger than they are.

    This is why Australians are getting behind Wild Koalas Day on May 3rd. Wild Koala Day is about connecting koalas with habitat protection. If we are all to enjoy koalas, we need them to survive in the wild, not just in captivity. Act now to save them! On Wild Koala Day, May 3rd, plant a tree, protect the forest and phone a politician!

    Photo Credit: Echidna Walkabout

    Photo Credit: Echidna Walkabout

    References

    (1) http://theconversation.com/how-many-visitors-can-a-koala-bear-not-many-it-seems-26970

    (2) http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0007378

    (3) https://www.iucn.org/content/species-climate-change-hit-list-named

    (4) The 5-6 overabundant koala populations:

    • Cape Otway/Great Ocean Road, VIC
    • Raymond Island, East Gippsland VIC
    • Portland/south western VIC
    • Kangaroo Island, SA
    • Adelaide Hills/Mt Lofty Ranges, SA
    • French Island, VIC

    January 16, 2018 • Articles, Australia, Bloggers • Views: 5273